SPH3UI
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Errors
Kinematics
Forces
Work and Energy
Nuclear
Waves and Sound
Electric
Circuits
Marks                   

SPH3UI

COURSE OUTLINE   Sept 2016

Curriculum:          The Ontario Curriculum Grades 11 and 12: Science (2000)

[click logo to see curriculum guide]  

                                       

Text:                        Physics 11 NELSON (2003, Hirsch,  et. al.)/Giancoli

                         

Description: 

 

Throughout this course, students will:

* demonstrate an understanding of safety practices by selecting, operating, and storing equipment appropriately, and by acting in accordance with the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) legislation in selecting and applying appropriate techniques for handling, storing, and disposing of laboratory materials (e.g., wear appropriate protective clothing when handling radioactive substances);
* select appropriate instruments and use them effectively and accurately in collecting observations and data (e.g., select appropriate instruments, such as stopwatches, photogates, and/or data loggers, when preparing an investigation concerning the law of conservation of energy);
* demonstrate the skills required to design and carry out experiments related to the topics under study, controlling major variables and adapting or extending procedures where required (e.g., design an experiment to determine the relationship between the force applied to a spring and the extension produced);
* locate, select, analyse, and integrate information on topics under study, working independently and as part of a team, and using appropriate library and electronic research tools, including Internet sites;
* compile, organize, and interpret data, using appropriate formats and treatments, including tables, flow charts, graphs, and diagrams (e.g., analyse the forces acting on an object, using free-body diagrams);
* use appropriate scientific models (theories, laws, explanatory devices) to explain and predict the behaviour of natural phenomena;
* analyse and synthesize information for the purpose of identifying problems for inquiry, and solve the problems using a variety of problem-solving skills;
* select and use appropriate SI units, and apply unit analysis techniques when solving problems;
* select and use appropriate numeric, symbolic, graphical, and linguistic modes of representation (e.g., algebraic equations, vector diagrams, ray diagrams, graphs, graphing programs, spreadsheets) to communicate scientific ideas, plans, and experimental results;
* communicate the procedures and results of investigations and research for specific purposes using data tables, laboratory reports, and research papers, and account for discrepancies between theoretical and experimental values with reference to experimental uncertainty;
* express the result of any calculation involving experimental data to the appropriate number of decimal places or significant figures;
* identify and describe science- and technology-based careers related to the subject area under study (e.g., mechanical engineer, civil engineer, medical doctor, astronomer, air-traffic controller, nuclear physicist).

This Course is Part 1 of the AP Physics Level B course

Evaluation:            70% is based on tests, quizzes,  assignments  

                              30% is based on  Exam.

Errors and Error Analysis

	          Significant Digits
	          Handling Uncertainties
	          Error Analysis                   (this is a complete document, keep it handy)
         

Lab Record:  Format of Lab Record

                        Visit: http://www.physics.ubc.ca/~phys209/pics/good_writeup/

                        Visit: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/mentoring/printable_project_logbook.pdf

Lab report:    Format and Example of Lab Report

                        Visit: http://www.ecf.toronto.edu/~writing/handbook-lab.html

Excel Tutorial

                         Excel Tutorial website

                         Excel Charts Techniques

Topics:   

 

1.     Title and course info:

Waterloo Collegiate Institute – Science Department

SPH3UI, Period I, Room 400, Mr. Burns

Contact Info: burns@mjburns.net, Science Teacher Prep Room Rm 202 Period C/G/H

 

 

2.        Course Description:  

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic AP

From: The Ontario Curriculum Grade 11 and 12 Science (Revised 2008), p. 194

Textbooks:

                    SPH 3UI: Alan Hirsch et al., Physics 11, Nelson-Thomson Learning, 2001. ISBN 0-17-612102-1

             

As indicated in the Student Handbook a fee of $10 for laboratory enhancements will be collected at the beginning of this course. This fee has been reviewed and approved by the WCI Administration in June 2009.

3.        Overall Expectations -

Course Outline: SPH 3UI (Strands may not be delivered in the order listed)

Overall Expectations: ( Ontario Curriculum Grades 10 and 12 Science)

Textbook Reference: Physics 11

A.   Scientific Investigation Skills and Career Exploration

Throughout this course, students will:

1.       demonstrate scientific investigation skills (related to both inquiry and research) in the four areas of skills (initiating and planning, performing and recording, analysing and interpreting, and communicating);

2.       identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study, and identify scientists, including Canadians, who have made contributions to those fields.

 

B.       Kinematics

By the end of this course, students will:

1.     analyse technologies that apply concepts related to kinematics, and assess the technologies’ social and environmental impact;

2.     investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, uniform and non- uniform linear motion, and solve related problems;

3.       demonstrate an understanding of uniform and non-uniform linear motion, in one and two dimensions.

Ch 1: Motion

 

C.        Forces

By the end of this course, students will:

1.     analyse and propose improvements to technologies that apply concepts related to dynamics and Newton ’s laws, and assess the technologies’ social and environmental impact;

2.     investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, net force, acceleration, and mass, and solve related problems;

3.     demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between changes in velocity and unbalanced forces in one dimension.

Ch 2: Forces and Newton ’s Laws of Motion

Ch 3: Gravitational Force and Friction

D.       Energy and Society

By the end of this course, students will:

1.     analyse technologies that apply principles of and concepts related to energy transformations, and assess the technologies’ social and environmental impact;

2.     investigate energy transformations and the law of conservation of energy, and solve related problems;

3.     demonstrate an understanding of work, efficiency, power, gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy, nuclear energy, and thermal energy and its transfer (heat).

Ch 4: Energy, Work, Heat and Power

Ch 5: Using Energy in Our Society

E.        Waves and Sound

By the end of this course, students will:

1.     analyse how mechanical waves and sound affect technology, structures, society, and the environment, and assess ways of reducing their negative effects;

2.     investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, the properties of mechanical waves and sound, and solve related problems;

3.     demonstrate an understanding of the properties of mechanical waves and sound and of the principles underlying their production, transmission, interaction, and reception.

Ch 6: Vibrations and Waves

Ch 7: Properties of Sound Waves

Ch 8: Music, Musical Instruments, and

Acoustics

F.       Electricity and Magnetism

By the end of this course, students will:

1.     analyse the social, economic, and environmental impact of electrical energy production and technologies related to electromagnetism, and propose ways to improve the sustainability of electrical energy production;

2.     investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, magnetic fields and electric circuits, and solve related problems;

3.     demonstrate an understanding of the properties of magnetic fields, the principles of current and electron flow, and the operation of selected technologies that use these properties and principles to produce and transmit electrical energy

Ch 12: Electricity

Ch 13: Electromagnetism

Ch 14: Electromagnetic Induction

ACHIEVEMENT CHART: SCIENCE, GRADES 9-12

Categories

50-59% (Level 1)

60-69% (Level 2)

70-79% (Level 3)

80-100% (Level4)

Knowledge and Understanding - Subject-specific content acquired in each course (knowledge), and the comprehension of its meaning and significance (understanding)

 

The student:

Knowledge of content (e.g., facts, terminology, definitions, safe use of equipment and materials)

demonstrates limited knowledge of content

demonstrates some knowledge of content

demonstrates considerable knowledge of content

demonstrates thorough knowledge of content

Understanding of content (e.g., concepts, ideas, theories, principles, procedures, processes)          

demonstrates limited understanding of content

demonstrates some understanding of content

demonstrates considerable understanding of content

demonstrates thorough understanding of content

Thinking and Investigation - The use of critical and creative thinking skills and inquiry, research, and problem-solving skills and/or processes

 

The student:

Use of initiating and planning skills and strategies (e.g., formulating questions, identifying the problem, developing hypotheses, selecting strategies and resources, developing plans)

uses initiating and planning skills and strategies with limited effectiveness

uses initiating and planning skills and strategies with some effectiveness

uses initiating and planning skills and strategies with considerable effectiveness

uses initiating and planning skills and strategies with a high degree of effectiveness

Use of processing skills and strategies (e.g., performing and recording, gathering evidence and data, observing, manipulating materials and using equipment safely, solving equations, proving)

 

uses processing skills and strategies with limited effectiveness

uses processing skills and strategies with some effectiveness

uses processing skills and strategies with considerable effectiveness

uses processing skills and strategies with a high degree of effectiveness

Use of critical/creative thinking processes, skills, and strategies (e.g., analysing, interpreting, problem solving, evaluating, forming and justifying conclusions on the basis of evidence )

uses critical/creative thinking processes, skills, and strategies with limited effectiveness

uses critical/creative thinking processes, skills, and strategies with some effectiveness

uses critical/creative thinking processes, skills, and strategies with considerable effectiveness

uses critical/creative thinking processes, skills, and strategies with a high degree of effectiveness

 

 

4. Course Evaluation:


 “The SPH4UI course will be evaluated based on term work worth 70% of your final report grade and the components of the final evaluation are worth 30% of your final grade.  Term work includes; tests, quizzes, assignments, lab reports.  Our final evaluation will be composed of a final exam.”

 

The final grade will be determined as follows:

Assessment

Percentage

Knowledge and Understanding

Communication                                              

Application                                                   

Thinking and Investigation                         

June Examination                                         

Total

              25%

              15%

              15%

              15%

              30%

            100%

 

5. Late Work Policy:  

At WCI is the expectation that students will submit all required work by the assigned due date as evidence of their learning.  Students who fail to meet a due date for an essential course component will be subject to the completion policy found the student planner. Failure to submit this work, despite these interventions, will be recorded as incomplete and may result in a loss of credit.”  

6. Cheating/Plagiarism Policy :
 

At WCI it is the expectation that students will submit their own original work for the purpose of demonstrating their learning.  In the event that cheating or plagiarism occurs, the following              consequences may be implemented, in consultation with administration, depending on the     situation:

·         The student may be required to redo all or part of the assignment or assessment.

·         The student may be required to complete an alternate assignment of assessment.

·         The student’s work may be treated as a missed assignment.

·         There may be other consequences that are determined to be appropriate, including disciplinary consequences as outlined in the Cheating/Plagiarism section of the student planner.”

 

7. Learning Skills :

 

The development of learning skills and work habits is an integral part of a student’s learning.  The achievement of these skills is officially reported on the Provincial Report Card.  The evaluation of learning skills and work habits is reported as follows: E-Excellent, G-Good, S-Satisfactory, and N-Needs Improvement.  For a full description of the 6 Learning Skills; Responsibility, Organization, Independent Work, Collaboration, Initiative, and Self-Regulation, please see the WCI Student Planner.”